ANT+ Device Profiles
Welcome Guest,Register Now
Log In

ANT+ Device Profiles

Before you start working with ANT+ you will need to understand the basics of how the ANT protocol works. If you haven’t already gone through the ANT Basics section, then please do so now and then come back to this page. It will save you time!

ANT+ Device Profiles

Each device profile is identified by its own icon, which can be used on the packaging of certified devices to help consumers understand which products will work together.  You can find the device profile PDFs under the documents tab of the Download page.

Racquet

An ANT+ racquet sensor is a portable sensor attached to a racquet that allows an athlete to measure and record a variety of real-time racquet sport parameters. Sport specific data such as ball speed, number of shots, shot selection and swing accuracy can be detected by the racquet sensor, stored, and transmitted in real time to a display device. The display device may be a watch, cell phone or other type of personal display.

The display device may also contain user entered data (e.g. set count, match count, current score) and additional data transmitted from other ANT+ sensor devices (heart rate, average running speed, etc.). A mechanism is provided to transmit this data to the racquet sensor for storage as the sensor may act as the primary storage device.

Session information stored in the racquet sensor may also be transmitted as a FIT file to the display device or a personal computer (PC). In the alternate configuration where the display device is the primary storage device, the display device may transmit its FIT file to a personal computer upon request.

Racquet icon

Racquet

 

  • Current Stroke: stroke type, raquet zone, ball speed
  • Summary data (on request)
  • Capabilities

left and right arrows

  • Score
  • Session start/stop, game, set, match markers
  • ANT+ fitness data

 

Sports watch

 

Sync

An ANT+ sync client or sync host may be used to record and store activity or sports information. This allows the user to review their activities at a more convenient time, potentially with a personal trainer or health professional.

An ANT+ sync client is typically a personal device such as a sports watch or a smart phone. Data such as speed, distance, or heart rate is collected and stored from multiple sensors including other ANT+ sensors. Once the user has completed their activity, this data is then made available for download by an ANT+ sync host such as a PC, phone or tablet.

Stored data is formatted according to the Flexible and Interoperable Data Transfer (FIT) protocol and transferred using ANT-FS to ensure interoperability.

Sync icon

 

Sports watch

 

 

 

  • Send Activity FIT file
  • Send other FIT file (Optional)

 

 

 

 

Muscle Oxygen Monitor

Muscle oxygen (SmO2) is a measure of the percentage of hemoglobin that is saturated with oxygen in the capillaries of a muscle. This value typically decreases as a muscle does work, for example when a person is exercising, and increases when blood circulation brings new oxygen to the muscle. The percentage of muscle oxygen varies from muscle to muscle depending on which muscle is used to perform a particular action.

A muscle oxygen monitor may be used by athletes to monitor the intensity of their training, and by coaches and physiotherapists to identify which muscles are being used when. An ANT+ muscle oxygen monitor provides a real time indication of the percentage of muscle oxygen in a particular muscle, which is transmitted wirelessly to a display such as a sports watch, mobile phone or tablet, and/or a PC.

An ANT+ muscle oxygen monitor may also store measurement data for transfer to a collection device. The data in the file is formatted according to the Flexible and Interoperable Data Transfer (FIT) protocol and transferred using ANT- FS.

Once an ANT-FS session is established, any stored data available can be downloaded from the muscle oxygen monitor. The display/collection device may then maintain the ANT-FS session allowing for periodic file transfers of data, or it may disconnect the ANT-FS session, at which point the sensor shall return to the real time data broadcast.

MO2 icon

 

Muscle Oxygen Monitor

 

  • Total Hemoglobin Concentration
  • Current & Previous Saturated Hemoglobin %
  • Capabilities

left and right arrows

  • Set UTC time
  • Mark session start/stop or new lap

 

Sports watch

 

Weight Scale

ANT+ weight scales are devices primarily used to measure the weight of the user that is placed on them. This requires the user to stand on the scale to take a measurement of the user’s weight.

The weight scale measures a user’s weight and, if the scale has access to more specific user information such as height and gender, then the scale may be able to calculate user specific information as well. The weight scale may broadcast this information to an ANT+ compatible receiver, or store it for transfer at a later date. The scale may have an integrated display, allowing users to enter profile information. The scale may also receive user profile information from a watch or other device.

One key aspect for the weight scale message definition is the incorporation of user specific data for calculating parameters that cannot be directly measured. Such data contains parameters that describe the user’s height, age, gender, and other relevant details that may be required for more complex measurements and calculations. The User Profile contains this information and can be provided to the scale by the display device or, depending on the scale’s capabilities, can be input directly through the scale’s user interface.

Weight Scale icon

 

 

 

Weight Scale

 

  • Weight
  • User profile (optional)
  • % Hydration (optional)
  • % Body fat (optional)
  • Active & Basal Metabolic Rate (optional)
  • Muscle Mass (optional)
  • Bone Mass (optional)

left and right arrows

  • User profile (height, gender, age, athlete setting, activity level) (optional)

 

 

Sports watch

 

Stride Based Speed and Distance

A stride based speed and distance monitor (SDM) is a personal body-worn device that allows the wearer to measure the number of strides taken, the speed at which he or she is traveling and/or the distance he or she has covered based on stride measurements and calculations. Some examples of SDMs include the foot-worn pods that go on, or in, a shoe and reconstruct strides to compute speed and distance while walking or running. Similarly, pedometers that may be worn on the waist or elsewhere are also considered SDMs. There are other profiles that allow for the measurement of speed and distance obtained from sensors that are not stride based. If there is some uncertainty about what device profile to use, please contact the ANT+ Alliance at antalliance@thisisant.com for more information.

SDMs are worn on, or close to, the body and transmit stride, speed and/or distance information to a watch or other display device. Some SDMs can compute additional information such as cadence. The display device can be a watch, cell phone, piece of fitness equipment, or other personal display device.

STP icon

 

Pedometer

 

 

  • Stride count
  • Timestamp (optional)

right arrow

 

Sports watch

 

STP icon Foot SPD icon

 

 

 

Foot pod

 

  • Distance
  • Speed
  • Stride Count
  • Timestamp (optional)
  • Cadence (optional)
  • Calories (optional)

right arrow

 

Sports watch

 

Light Electric Vehicle

Light electric vehicles (LEVs) provide point-to-point transportation for one person and some cargo at speeds and costs that are moderate. LEVs range in size from electric bicycles to one-person cars.

The ANT+ light electric vehicle provides a variety of information such as current speed, distance travelled, remaining battery life and range, and current state information (such as lights on/off, gear state and travel mode). An ANT+ LEV display is used to communicate this information to the user, and may also provide an interface through which a user may control the LEV’s state. The display device may be a bike mounted unit, watch, cell phone or other personal display device. The purpose of the ANT+ LEV device profile is to provide a robust means of interoperable communication between LEVs and displays.

Many LEVs have a gear system that may be manually or automatically controlled. Some may have defined “travel modes” that allow the LEV to operate within economical, normal and higher power ranges. Some LEV’s may also provide peripheral devices such as headlights and/or indicator signals. These system features may be controlled on the LEV itself, or through a sophisticated display’s user interface.

Simple displays may not provide a user interface and are only used to interpret the data sent from the LEV. More sophisticated displays may provide an interface for the user to request a change to the LEV system, such as changing gears or travel mode, and controlling lights or turn signals.

LEV icon

 

 

 

 

 

LEV

 

  • Speed & Distance
  • System & Gear State (throttle, lights, signals)
  • Supported modes & Current Travel Mode (assist / regenerative)
  • Battery Status
  • Remaining Range (optional)
  • Distance since Last Charge (optional)
  • Fuel Consumption Rate (optional)
  • Charging Cycle Count (optional)
  • Motor & Battery Temperature (optional)
  • % Assistance (optional)
  • Wheel Circumference (optional)
  • Errors (optional)

left and right arrows

  • Change gear
  • Change travel mode
  • Control lights (on/off & beam strength)
  • Control indicator lights

 

 

 

 

Bike computer

 

Heart Rate Monitor

A heart rate monitor is a body-worn device that allows the wearer to measure his or her heart rate in real-time. Most heart rate monitors are worn around the chest and transmit heart rate data to watches or other display devices. However other types of monitors such as finger sensors, earlobe sensors, or the hand contact sensors on fitness machines may also use this device profile to transmit heart rate data. Similarly, the receiver need not be a watch but may be a cell phone, piece of fitness equipment, activity monitor, or other personal display device.

ANT+ Heart Rate Monitor Receiver Implementation

The Heart Rate Monitor device profile was the first ANT+ message format to be defined, and the structure it uses to send the data is slightly different to that typically found in other profiles. It is important that the receiver is able to decode all of the data that can be sent from an ANT+ heart rate monitor, including the information marked as optional below in order to ensure compatibility with all ANT+ Heart Rate Monitors.

 

 

Heart rate strap

 

  • Last Heart Beat
  • Time of Previous Heart Beat
  • Heart Beat Count
  • Computed Heart Rate
  • Cumulative Operating Time (optional)
  • Manufacturer ID & Serial Number

right arrow

 

 

sports watch

 

Fitness Equipment Device

The standard use case of the Fitness Equipment device profile is shown below. The fitness equipment has a relatively small pairing zone, marked by the “Link Here” logo. A user begins a fitness session by approaching the fitness equipment and entering the pairing zone. If the user is wearing a watch, pairing between the watch and equipment will occur when the user places their watch within close proximity to the “Link Here” logo. Once pairing has been established, the range of communication between the watch and FE moves from the pairing zone to the tracking zone. The watch may wirelessly transfer user information and a workout or course file using ANT File Share (ANT-FS) technology and the Flexible and Interoperable Data Transfer (FIT) protocol. The fitness equipment will then begin broadcasting real time workout data which may also include events such as workout starts and stops, as well as lap events. The watch displays and records data, and responds to any events (i.e. starting/stopping chronometer and recording lap events).

Fitness Equipment use case illustration

Once the watch and FE have been paired, the watch will provide a file to the fitness equipment containing user information and may also transfer a workout or course profile.

The FE can also broadcast real-time workout data to the paired watch. Different types of FE may send different types of data. For example, treadmills may send speed, distance and incline information, whereas a rowing machine may send strokes per minute and power data. Data may be stored on the watch and summarized at the end of the workout session. The watch may display the summary data at the end of the session, or store it for later download to a PC.

FIT1e-Enabled Devices and the FE Profile

ANT+ Fitness Equipment is designed using a FIT1e module, an application-specific ANT module designed specifically for use in fitness equipment. The FIT1e integrates with fitness equipment to receive ANT+ information from heart rate monitors (HRMs) and exchange information with display devices such as watches.

Fitness equipment icon

 

 

 

 

 

fitness equipment console

 

  • Start / Stop / Pause workout

General data

  • Settings (Cycle length, Incline, Resistance level)
  • Distance, Speed, Heart Rate
  • Metabolic data

Equipment specific data

  • Treadmill (Cadence, Vertical distance)
  • Elliptical (Vertical distance, Stride count, Cadence, Power)
  • Bike (Cadence, Power)
  • Rower (Stroke count, Stroke rate, Power)
  • Climber (Cycles, Cadence, Power)
  • Nordic Skier (Stride count, Cadence, Power)

left and right arrows

  • User profile
  • Workout plan

 

 

 

 

sports watch

 

Environment

The ANT+ environment sensor is a device that allows a variety of environmental parameters to be measured. Data such as current temperature, and 24 hour highs and/or lows may be transmitted to a collector device for real time display, or stored on the environment sensor for later download to a PC or other collecting device.

Typically the ANT+ environment sensor transmits temperature data at a default 0.5Hz or 4Hz rate.

On receiving a request for data from the display:

  • Devices with a default transmission rate of 0.5 Hz shall increase its message rate to 4 Hz for a 30 second timeout, after which the sensor shall return to a transmission rate of 0.5 H. Each time a request message is received from a display, the timeout is reset.
  • Devices with a default transmission rate of 4 Hz maintain a 4 Hz transmission rate.

The ANT+ environment sensor may store measurement data for transfer to a collection device. The data in the file is formatted according to the Flexible and Interoperable Data Transfer (FIT) protocol and transferred using ANT-FS.

Once an ANT-FS session is established, any stored data available can be downloaded from the environment sensor. The display/collection device may then maintain the ANT-FS session allowing for periodic file transfers of data, or it may disconnect the ANT-FS session, at which point the sensor shall return to the real time data broadcast.

thermometer

 

 

  • Current Temperature
  • 24 hour low (optional)
  • 24 hour high (optional)
  • File transfer (optional)

right arrow

 

phone

 

Bicycle Speed and Cadence

Bike speed sensors are devices mounted on a bicycle that measure the speed the bicycle is travelling. This is typically done using a magnet mounted on the wheel spokes and a sensor on the bicycle frame that senses the magnet passing. Bike cadence sensors measure the speed at which the user is pedalling, typically using a magnet attached to the pedal shaft and a sensor mounted on the frame. The standard mode of operation is for the bike speed or cadence sensor to transmit its measured data to the receiving display device. Typically this device is a bike computer, but it could be any ANT+ display device capable of decoding bike speed and cadence information, such as a watch, cell phone, PDA, etc.

The ANT+ Bicycle Speed and Cadence device profile describes the wireless link between the transmitting bike sensors and the receiving display device. The sensors communicate with the receiving device in one of four modes:

  1. Bike Speed Sensor Only – A single speed sensor on the bike requires a single ANT channel to communicate data.
  2.  Bike Cadence Sensor Only – A single cadence sensor on the bike requires a single ANT channel to communicate data.
  3.   Bike Speed and Cadence Sensors – Two sensors on the bike (speed and cadence) each require a single ANT channel to communicate data. The receiver must have two active channels, composed of modes 1 and 2, open.
  4.  Combined Bike Speed and Cadence Sensor – This mode has combined both the speed and cadence sensors into a single sensor. One sensor transmits data about the user’s speed and cadence over a single ANT channel.

It is strongly recommended that the receiving display device be able to accept and display data from all four modes of operation. Therefore the use cases and technical content for the different sensors have been put together into this single document. Developers of devices intending to display bike speed and cadence information are requested to implement all the device definitions. The added firmware size to enable all three device profiles in the display device’s firmware is a small cost for the large reward of interoperability with multiple devices.

Bike SPD icon

 

speed/cadence sensor

 

  • Latest Speed Event Time
  • Cumulative Wheel Revolutions
  • Stopped flag indicating zero speed (optional)
  • Battery level (optional)
  • Cumulative Operating Time (optional)
  • Manufacturer ID and Serial Number
  • Hardware Version, Software Version and Model Number

left and right arrows

Bike computer

 

Bike CAD icon

 

speed/cadence sensor

 

  • Latest Cadence Event Time
  • Cumulative Pedal Revolutions
  • Stopped flag indicating zero cadence (optional)
  • Battery level (optional)
  • Cumulative Operating Time (optional)
  • Manufacturer ID and Serial Number
  • Hardware Version, Software Version and Model Number

left and right arrows

Bike computer

 

Bike S&C icon

 

speed/cadence sensor

 

  • Latest Speed Event Time
  • Cumulative Wheel Revolutions
  • Latest Cadence Event Time
  • Cumulative Pedal Revolutions

left and right arrows

Bike computer

 

Bicycle Power

A bike power sensor is a sensor that is mounted on a bicycle and that allows the cyclist to measure his or her power output, which is used to move the bike forward and is measured in Watts. The meter transmits the information to a display device; the device can be a bike computer, watch, cell phone, piece of fitness equipment, or other personal display device.

Bicycle Power Sensor Types

Bike power sensors vary in two ways: in the method used to measure power and in the conditions and interval used to update and broadcast power information.

The ANT+ message definition currently supports power sensors that use different measurements to determine power:

  1. measure power directly
  2. measure torque and rotational velocity at the crank
  3. measure torque and rotational velocity at the wheel

All of the broadcast power messages have an Update Event Counter that is used by the receiver to calculate information accurately. There are two methods used by bicycle power sensors for information updates:

  1. Event-Synchronous Update e.g. the power information is updated each time the power sensor detects a new crank rotation.
  2. Time-Synchronous Update e.g. the power information is updated at 1Hz.

Messages Transmitted from the ANT+ Bike Power Sensor

ANT+ bike power data pages support various types of bike power sensors. The basic power format is implemented using a simple Power-Only message transmitted at a slow rate along with more detailed main power messages at a higher data rate. Main power messages are specific to the power methods used; there are four currently supported methods.

Bike PWR icon

The first three methods, Power only; Torque at Wheel; Torque at Crank; are associated with the icon PWR.

CTF iconThe fourth method Crank Torque Frequency is associated with the CTF icon.

The information sent in each of these cases is illustrated below and described in detail within the device profile. Devices using the PWR icon are not guaranteed to be interoperable with devices using the CTF icon, and vice versa. It is possible for a display device to carry both icons.

Bike PWR icon

 

 

power sensor

 

  • Power-only data
  • Torque and Speed data (optional)
  • Torque and Cadence data (optional)
  • Torque Effectiveness and Pedal Smoothness (optional)

left and right arrows

  • Calibration
  • Auto-zero (optional)

 

Bike computer

 

CTF icon

 

 

power sensor

 

  • Torque ticks
  • Slope, Timestamp, and Event counter

left and right arrows

  • Calibration

 

 

Bike computer

 

Multi Sport Speed and Distance

A multi-sport speed and distance monitor (MSM) is a personal device that allows the user to measure the distance travelled and computes the speed at which they are traveling. Unlike stride based systems, this class of sensor may use satellite positioning, radar, or other technologies to measure the distance travelled, allowing MSMs to be used for a wide range of activities with varied user motion and speed ranges. MSMs report distance travelled with an accompanying time stamp and may be used for activities such as running, cycling, alpine skiing, in-line skating, etc.

The MSM is worn on or close to the body and contains an ANT transmitter that broadcasts speed and distance information to a receiver where it may be displayed or stored. Some MSM devices may also have the ability to send other data, such as GPS position. The receiving device can be a watch, cell phone, or any personal display device.

Note: This device profile should not be used for stride based devices such as footpods and pedometers. If you are uncertain about which device profile to use for a sensor that you manufacture please contact the ANT+ Alliance at antalliance@thisisant.com for more information.

Multi Sport SPD icon

Multi Sport speed and distance monitor

 

  • Distance & Timestamp
  • Speed (optional)

 

sports watch

 

Multi Sport SPD icon GPS icon

Multi Sport speed and distance monitor

 

  • Distance & Timestamp
  • Speed (optional)
  • Latitude & Longitude
  • Heading (optional)

 

sports watch

 

Geocache

The ANT+ Geocache Device Profile uses the term geocaching to mean an activity where the user has a GPS receiver which is used to track down a hidden, electronic geocache device.

Typically the owner of the geocache device programs and hides the device, providing general location information, such as the latitude/longitude coordinates or trailhead information to a geocaching website, database or other service. The user may then obtain this information from the service, enter this information into their GPS, and start searching for the geocache device.

The geocache device continuously transmits its ID at a low data rate, allowing it to be detected by a searching GPS receiver. Once the user enters the vicinity of the geocache device, the searching GPS receiver detects the geocache device transmissions and requests an exchange of the geocache device’s data.

Geocache icon  Typical Use

 

 

 

 

Chirp

 

  • Identity
  • PIN
  • Total pages
  • Text messages (optional)
  • Next stage positional coordinates (optional)
  • Hints for new location (optional)
  • Time of last visit (optional)

right arrows

 

 

Chirp

 

  Geocache iconProgramming

 

 

 

 

Chirp

 

  • Identity
  • PIN
  • Total pages
  • Text messages (optional)
  • Next stage positional coordinates (optional)
  • Hints for new location (optional)

left arrow

 

 

Chirp

 

Blood Pressure

All blood pressure (BP) monitors are designed to take the user’s blood pressure. This is usually accomplished using a sphygmomanometer cuff, which is placed around the user’s upper arm at approximately the same height as the heart. The cuff is inflated until the flow of blood in the brachial artery is momentarily stopped, and then the cuff is deflated until blood flow returns and the arterial pressure is recorded. Electronic BP monitors usually have the ability to display the measured arterial pressure values, as well as other measured and calculated data, such as heart rate and the detection of any pulse irregularities.

Typical Use of an ANT+ Blood Pressure Device

An ANT+ blood pressure device will have the ability to store recorded data, and forward this information to another device when required.

Some blood pressure devices may have the ability to store multiple measurements from multiple users. The ANT+ Blood Pressure Device Profile allows for devices to have the necessary scalability to handle multiple users and their associated user profiles.

Note that this device profile does not allow for real time data transfer. Blood pressure data must first be stored in FIT files and then transferred using ANT-FS.

The collection device will store, display and possibly track the data received from the blood pressure device. The collection device can be a device such as a cell phone or laptop computer that may have direct internet access; or it may be a device like a PDA or wrist top computer that will act as a transfer device for the received data.

Ultimately the blood pressure measurements will be stored in a database application, for example an online health database or at a health professional’s office. The information may be transmitted from the blood pressure device to a collection device and then over the internet to a database for storage and possibly further analysis.

Blood pressure icon

 

 

 

 

Blood pressure monitor

 

Download files:

  • Systolic Blood Pressure
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure
  • Heart Rate
  • Timestamp
  • Mean Arterial Pressure (optional)
  • Morning / evening values (optional)
  • Heart Rate Type (optional)
  • User profile data (optional)
  • Device status & identity

Upload files (e.g. user profile - optional):

  • Name
  • Gender
  • Age
  • Height
  • Weight
  • Resting Heart Rate

Erase files

 

 

 

 

Controls

Personal audio devices, video devices, smart phones and other displays are often used during activities that may also be monitored by many traditional ANT+ devices. For example, people that enjoy running will often wear a music player during their workout. Cyclists often use bike computers, but would prefer to keep their hands on the handlebars while operating them. A skateboarder or dancer may choose to mount a video camera remotely to record them as they perform, while also recording their heart rate. In these situations, it is a logical solution to use a single device both to display information received from body worn Personal Area Network (PAN) sensors, and to act as a remote control for the remote device.

The ANT+ Controls Device Profile includes four control use cases, that can be used separately or combined within a remote control or controllable device.  Each use case is associated with its own icon and transmits information / control commands as illustrated below.

Audio Control

Audio control allows a user to control their audio player remotely while they work out. For example, a runner may wish to control their music player from their watch as they run.

 

sports watch

 

  • Play / Pause / Stop etc.
  • Adjust the volume (Up / Down / Mute)
  • Change the current playing track (Next track and Previous track)

left and right arrows

  • Current volume level
  • Current time within the track
  • State of any alerts from the audio device
  • Current state of the music player (Playing / Paused / Stopped)

 

Audio player

 

Video Control

Video control allows a user to control video recording and playback remotely. This could be useful in several situations including:

  1. Recording: A cyclist wearing a helmet camera can start / stop the recording from his / her bike computer
  2. Playback: A person training in the gym or at home can control the video clips on a TV / laptop while they work out.

ANT+ Video Camera Control Icon

 

sports watch

 

  • Play / Pause / Stop / Record / Take photo etc.
  • Adjust the volume (Up / Down / Mute)
  • Change the current playing clip (Next clip and Previous clip)

left and right arrows

  • Current volume level
  • Current time within the clip or time remaining to record
  • State of any alerts from the video device
  • Current state of the video player (Playing / Recording / Paused / Stopped, etc.)

 

action camera

 

Generic Control

Generic control is used to send generic commands using ANT+. These commands are generic in nature and therefore may be applicable to a very wide range of devices. The commands are also context specific and it is assumed that the user can see the device they are controlling.

Generic control currently includes menu navigation and timer control commands, and is ideal for controlling bike computers, and other fitness equipment displays using a conveniently mounted remote control. It could also be used in combination with other control types, for example video control to operate an ANT+ enabled TV.

ANT+ Generic Control Icon

 

sports watch

 

  • Menu commands: Up / Down / Select / Back / Home
  • Timer commands: Start / Stop / Reset / Lap / Length

left and right arrows

  • Device availability

Bike Computer

 

Keypad Control

Keypad control is used to send individual characters or strings from a remote control to a controllable device. This may be used in combination with other control use cases, for example to enter a user name and passwords, or playlist titles, or for any other situation where short strings need to be transferred wirelessly between devices within a short range.

 

sports watch

 

  • Character command (UTF-8 encoding)

left and right arrows

  • Device availability

 

Audio player

 

Working with Device Profiles

Once you have found a device profile that suits your use case, take a look at “How do I implement a profile?”.
If your use case is not yet covered by a device profile, please contact us to discuss.
If you need to check which device profiles an existing product supports, or vice versa, then use the Product Directory.